Although heating and cooling companies make every effort to get to customers quickly when a furnace dies, you may have to wait a bit for service. This is especially true during a very busy season such as winterr, so it’s important to know how to keep your family safe and warm while waiting for your furnace repair in Des Moines, IA.

Furnace

Close the Window and Seal any Openings

Since your furnace won’t be making any more warm air, you must conserve the heat you already have for as long as possible. Check for and close any open windows, close the doors to rooms you aren’t using and lay blankets or towels under any drafty doors. Minimize your trip outside since you will lose more heat every time the door is opened. Close the curtains in rooms without direct sunlight but open them wide where the sun is shining in.

Add Layers

When you start to get chilly, put on some long underwear and a sweatshirt or sweater. Keep adding additional layers of clothing as the temperature drops to keep warm. Sitting under blankets and wearing gloves and hats can also help when necessary.

Find Alternatives

If you have a fireplace, this is the time to use it. Remember, however, that fireplaces heat one room while drawing the heat out of others. Line the back of the fireplace with tin foil placed shiny side out to reflect heat back into the room and stay close to it to keep warm. You can also use any space heaters you have, but be very careful doing so and follow all safety instructions. Now may be a good time to do some baking, as well.

Know When to Call It

Depending on how long it takes to get your furnace repair in Des Moines done, your house may eventually become too cold to inhabit. If you have young children or elderly, you won’t be able to stay in the house as long as you might otherwise. Know when enough is enough and make arrangements to stay with friends, family or in a local motel until things warm up again.

Sources:
(12 Toasty Tips for Staying Warm in Cold Weather, MentalFloss.com)
(7 Scientific Tips for Staying Warm, LiveScience.com)